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Orange Daisy Patterns https://orangedaisypatterns.com Wed, 11 Apr 2018 19:48:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.6 https://orangedaisypatterns.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-favicon-32x32.png Orange Daisy Patterns https://orangedaisypatterns.com 32 32 Pattern Hack: How to Change the Color Blocking on the Hickory & Spice Henley https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-how-to-change-the-color-blocking-on-the-hickory-spice-henley?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pattern-hack-how-to-change-the-color-blocking-on-the-hickory-spice-henley https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-how-to-change-the-color-blocking-on-the-hickory-spice-henley#respond Wed, 11 Apr 2018 18:52:11 +0000 http://orangedaisypatterns.com/?p=556 The Hickory & Spice Henley is home from One Thimble! To celebrate, both this pattern and the Basilica Skirt (also newly here!) are on sale for 20% off! There is no coupon needed, and the sale goes through this Saturday (April 14, 2018).  One thing I love about the Hickory & Spice Henley is the […]

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The Hickory & Spice Henley is home from One Thimble! To celebrate, both this pattern and the Basilica Skirt (also newly here!) are on sale for 20% off! There is no coupon needed, and the sale goes through this Saturday (April 14, 2018). 

One thing I love about the Hickory & Spice Henley is the shoulder color blocking. It lets me play with color and pattern in a fun way, and makes the shirt stand out among all the basic tees out there. Sometimes, though, I’d like a simpler look. You, too?

Good thing changing the color blocking is so easy! In this pattern hack, I’ll walk you through combining the Hickory & Spice’s front shoulder piece with the main shirt front. I’ll also demonstrate merging the front shoulder piece with the shirt back, as a way to bring a glimpse of a contrast back fabric around to the front.

Here we go!

Begin with your shirt front and front shoulder pattern pieces. Go ahead and blend the sizes if you need to. (As you can see, I need to blend—I’m making this shirt for my oldest daughter, who is size 4 for width and 7 for height. I love sewing her clothing that actually fits properly, instead of picking “good enough” ready-to-wear!)

I traced the front shoulder piece, which is the one we’ll alter, and will simply tape it onto the shirt front piece. No need to print a whole new copy of the pattern for a new look! Do make sure to mark which edge is the shoulder seam; wouldn’t want to get it turned around.

The seam allowance along the bottom of the front shoulder color blocking is marked with a pair of notches. Draw a line from notch to notch, and cut on your line.

The seam allowance along the top of the shirt front is also marked with a pair of notches. Align the front shoulder pattern piece with these notches and tape in place.

And that’s it! Sew the shirt just like normal (skipping past the part about sewing the front shoulder piece onto the shirt front, of course!).

Oh, and if you want to merge the front shoulder piece onto the back, the technique is the same.

Cut off the seam allowance from the shoulder seam side of the front shoulder piece, and line it up with the seam line of the shirt back. Tape in place. Be sure to still notch the original seam line, as you’ll need those marks for sewing the sleeve and neckband on correctly.

I love hacking a favorite, tried and true pattern! Here are other Hickory & Spice Henley pattern hacks:

Faux Layered Sleeves Tutorial
Faux Henley Placket Tutorial

I’m excited to see what you come up with! Share your creations with #OrangeDaisyPatterns, #HickoryandSpiceHenley and @orangedaisypatterns (on Instagram) so I can swoon at your sweet sews!

Happy sewing!

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Pattern Hack: How to Hack a Faux Placket on the Hickory & Spice Henley https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-how-to-hack-a-faux-placket-on-the-hickory-spice-henley?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pattern-hack-how-to-hack-a-faux-placket-on-the-hickory-spice-henley https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-how-to-hack-a-faux-placket-on-the-hickory-spice-henley#respond Sat, 17 Feb 2018 02:19:26 +0000 http://orangedaisypatterns.com/?p=616 The Hickory & Spice Henley is home from One Thimble! To celebrate, both this pattern and the Basilica Skirt (also newly here!) are on sale for 20% off! There is no coupon needed, and the sale goes through this Saturday (April 14, 2018).  Want to make the Hickory & Spice Henley a quicker sew? This […]

The post Pattern Hack: How to Hack a Faux Placket on the Hickory & Spice Henley appeared first on Orange Daisy Patterns.

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The Hickory & Spice Henley is home from One Thimble! To celebrate, both this pattern and the Basilica Skirt (also newly here!) are on sale for 20% off! There is no coupon needed, and the sale goes through this Saturday (April 14, 2018). 

Want to make the Hickory & Spice Henley a quicker sew? This past Christmas, I wanted to make one of these shirts for each of my three girls. It was almost Christmas by the time I got to that project on my list, so I decided to speed up the process by making their henleys into faux henleys.

Here’s how you can whip up your own faux henleys in no time flat!

When sewing a faux placket, you need to cut out only the longer of the two placket pieces. You don’t need as much fabric for the faux placket, so trim off 1/2” (1.27cm) from each long side. Those lines are already marked with notches, so that’s super easy!

Go ahead and clip the center notch on the top and bottom.

Fold the two long edges of the placket to the center. Press. Then fold up the bottom edge 1/2” (1.27cm). Press again.

While you’re pressing, go ahead and press a light crease down the center front of the shirt.

Using the shirt’s center front crease as a guide, line up the folded placket piece down the center of the shirt, with the placket’s cut edges facing the shirt and matching the top edge to the neckline. Pin or baste into place.

(I’ve also removed the color blocking for this particular version of the Hickory & Spice Henley. For that tutorial, go here.)

Carefully topstitch around the edges of the faux placket. Remember that you can use a straight stitch, as this will not need to stretch.

Go ahead and sew on any buttons or other non-functional closures. This helps it look legit. 😉

Next, you’ll sew the shoulder seams and prep the neckband as the pattern directs.

In the original pattern, the ends of the neckband get neatly tucked inside the placket pieces. Since there isn’t an “inside” anymore, simply pin the ends on top of the placket like so. The second side will go on top of the first in the same way.

Be sure to check which way the overlap should go! I’m always getting the boy’s overlap and the girl’s overlap switched if I’m not following my own instructions. (Silly me.)

(The fabric I used here is pretty stiff, and that curve there at the top of the placket isn’t going to line up very well with the raw edge of the neckline. It’s not a problem, though; if your fabric is like this, too, just match it up at the notch and end, and trim off the excess fabric after you sew the neckband on.)

Otherwise, sew on the neckband like in the original pattern.

And there you go! I love whipping out a quick faux henley placket when sewing time is limited (which, honestly, is most of the time). What do you think? Are you Team Real or Team Faux?

I hope you’ve enjoyed the Hickory & Spice Henley pattern hacks! I love all the ways this one pattern can be customized, altered, and made uniquely yours. I’m excited to see what you come up with! Share your creations with #OrangeDaisyPatterns, #HickoryandSpiceHenley and @orangedaisypatterns (on Instagram) so I can marvel at your amazingness!

Here are the pattern hack tutorials, in case you missed them!

Faux Layered Sleeves
Changing the Color Blocking on the Hickory & Spice Henley

Happy sewing!

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Pattern Hack: Faux Layered Sleeves for the Hickory & Spice Henley https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-faux-layered-sleeves-for-the-hickory-spice-henley?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pattern-hack-faux-layered-sleeves-for-the-hickory-spice-henley https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-faux-layered-sleeves-for-the-hickory-spice-henley#respond Fri, 02 Feb 2018 03:20:54 +0000 http://orangedaisypatterns.com/?p=545 The Hickory & Spice Henley is home from One Thimble! To celebrate, both this pattern and the Basilica Skirt (also newly here!) are on sale for 20% off! There is no coupon needed, and the sale goes through this Saturday (April 14, 2018).  I like to give my kids the freedom to choose what they […]

The post Pattern Hack: Faux Layered Sleeves for the Hickory & Spice Henley appeared first on Orange Daisy Patterns.

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The Hickory & Spice Henley is home from One Thimble! To celebrate, both this pattern and the Basilica Skirt (also newly here!) are on sale for 20% off! There is no coupon needed, and the sale goes through this Saturday (April 14, 2018). 

I like to give my kids the freedom to choose what they wear, as long as it’s reasonably weather-appropriate and basically situation-appropriate. (No bathing suits to church or to play in the snow, you know?) But…how are your kids at matching their clothes? Mine still err on the, um, creative side. (For example, my daughter always wears this particular shirt with a pink/white/red floral print Girls Brook Blossom Skirt. She’s convinced they go together.) And while little creative pattern mixing never hurt anyone, it is nice to have a few things already paired and matching. That’s something I like about these faux layered sleeves.

This pattern hack (which can be applied to most patterns with both short and long sleeve lengths; I’m using it on the Hickory & Spice Henley here) is a quick and easy way to add a cute layered look to an outfit without the fuss of wearing more layers. Or the crazy color choices of children who choose their own layers.

Here we go!

Cut out the short sleeve exactly as the pattern directs.

Draw a line one hem allowance up from the finished hem line. You’ll cut the bottom portion only of the long sleeve, going up to this line.

In the Hickory & Spice Henley pattern, the finished hem lengths are all marked with notches. The hem allowance is 3/4” (2cm), so cut the long sleeve section 3/4” (2cm) above the short sleeve notches.

Press up the hems on both the long and short sleeve.

Unfold the short sleeve hem, and line up the bottom edge of the short sleeve with the top edge of the long sleeve. Sew them right sides together with a 3/8” (1cm) seam allowance. Remember to use a stretch stitch.

Fold the short sleeve’s hem back up, and topstitch just like any hem. I like to use a faux coverstitch stitch my sewing machine has; so much easier than messing with the twin needle! (I’m showing you both the right side and wrong side of the sleeves in this picture.)

And there you go! Now you simply sew in the sleeves as per the pattern. Easy-peasy.

What do you think? Will you be adding faux layered sleeves to your kid’s (or your own!) shirts this autumn?

Hungry for more Hickory & Spice Henley hacks? 😀

Changing the Color Blocking on the Hickory & Spice Henley
Faux Henley Placket Tutorial

What will you do with the Hickory & Spice Henley? I’m excited to see what you come up with! Share your creations with #OrangeDaisyPatterns, #HickoryandSpiceHenley and @orangedaisypatterns (on Instagram) so I can bask in your brilliance!

Happy sewing!

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How to Sew a French Seam https://orangedaisypatterns.com/tips-tutorials/how-to-sew-a-french-seam?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-sew-a-french-seam https://orangedaisypatterns.com/tips-tutorials/how-to-sew-a-french-seam#respond Wed, 17 Jan 2018 02:11:14 +0000 http://orangedaisypatterns.com/?p=528 It’s time to bring my French seam tutorial home (originally published on One Thimble’s blog)! I do love a French seam…Let’s begin! Ah, the French seam. So sophisticated, so couture, so professional. Beautiful on both sides, strong, and with all raw edges completely enclosed, the French seam is my favorite type of seam. I used […]

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It’s time to bring my French seam tutorial home (originally published on One Thimble’s blog)! I do love a French seam…Let’s begin!

Ah, the French seam. So sophisticated, so couture, so professional. Beautiful on both sides, strong, and with all raw edges completely enclosed, the French seam is my favorite type of seam. I used them in the Girls Brook Blossom Skirt (ladies version, too) to give the skirt a beautifully finished interior. It’s the little things that take an article of clothing from homemade to handmade.

And French seams are not difficult to sew at all! The most difficult part of the whole process is remembering to start the seam off with the fabric wrong sides together.

French seams are best for light- to medium-weight woven fabrics, and are an especially great choice for sheers.

Ready?

Line up your two fabric pieces WRONG sides together. Sew the seam with at 3/8” (1cm) seam allowance. Press the seam as sewn to set the stitches.

Right before you sew the next line of stitching, trim the seam allowance down to 1/8” (3mm).

Why wait until you are ready to sew the next line? In fact, why trim at all? Why not simply sew a smaller seam allowance the first time through, then a larger the next? I’ve done that before, and the problem is that sometimes little threads fray off of the fabric and poke out to the right side of the seam. Like so.

Let’s avoid that, shall we?

Now you fold the fabric along the stitching line so that it is RIGHT sides together. (Back to normal!) Stitch 1/4” (6mm) away from the folded edge. Press the seam as sewn, then press to one side. The total seam allowance is 5/8” (1.5cm).

Oh, but what if the pattern calls for a different seam allowance than 5/8” (1.5cm)? You will need at least a 1/2” (1.2cm) seam allowance for a French seam, in which case you can sew the first seam with a 1/4” (6mm) seam allowance, then proceed as above.

See? Super easy. It does take a little longer than a standard seam, but having such a lovely and long-wearing finish is so worth it.

Have you sewn french seams before? What’s your favorite way to finish a seam?

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How to Sew a Rolled Hem https://orangedaisypatterns.com/tips-tutorials/how-to-sew-a-rolled-hem?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-sew-a-rolled-hem https://orangedaisypatterns.com/tips-tutorials/how-to-sew-a-rolled-hem#respond Tue, 16 Jan 2018 02:13:49 +0000 http://orangedaisypatterns.com/?p=513 Bringing home my tutorial from One Thimble! Have you ever wanted to sew a rolled hem? Sheer fabrics long to be finished with a rolled hem—rolled hems are so beautiful and unobtrusive on sheer fabrics. Curved hems, too, are great candidates for a rolled hem, as you don’t have to ease in the extra hem width. […]

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Bringing home my tutorial from One Thimble!

Have you ever wanted to sew a rolled hem? Sheer fabrics long to be finished with a rolled hem—rolled hems are so beautiful and unobtrusive on sheer fabrics. Curved hems, too, are great candidates for a rolled hem, as you don’t have to ease in the extra hem width. Rolled hems are ideal for hemming ruffles. And of course, if you have just barely enough length for the garment, the small hem allowance of the rolled hem also makes it a winner.

There are three ways to sew a rolled hem:

1) With a serger. But many people (including me!) do not have a serger. Also, the serger rolled hem looks different than a sewing machine rolled hem, and I prefer the latter.

2) With a rolled hem foot on a standard machine. But rolled hem feet tend to have a hard time going over seams, and very few garments don’t have side seams to deal with.

3) With a regular foot on a standard machine. No special equipment is needed, and it manages side seams with perfect ease. Also, the several lines of stitching in this method add a little extra weight, and having more weight in a hem makes for a nicer drape to the garment. Sheers in particular drape better with this (admittedly small) amount of extra weight.

How to sew a rolled hem with a regular foot on a standard machine

Rolled hems are intended for light to medium weight woven fabrics, and are the best choice for sheers. This method uses a 5/8” (1.5cm) hem allowance, but you could use slightly less if necessary.

Sew a line a scant 3/8” (1cm) from the edge of the fabric. (Scant means just barely the stated measurement, or possibly just slightly less.) If you need a smaller hem allowance, you could shrink this distance a bit.

I’m using a contrasting thread so you can see what’s going on, but, of course, you will want to use matching thread. Unless you’re going for contrast, in which case, have at it!

Use this stitching line to help you fold the fabric to the wrong side. Don’t press yet; if the hem is curved (as it is with the Brook Blossom Skirt), pressing at this stage can distort the hemline. Instead, simply stitch as you fold, this time 1/8” (3mm) from the folded edge.

Note: this is a maximum! If you are comfortable stitching even closer to the folded edge, go ahead! Just make sure to keep an even—and not more than 1/8” (3mm)—distance. You may want to experiment on a scrap of fabric to see what distance you prefer.

Trim the seam allowance as close as you can to the second stitching line. Seriously, trim as close as you possibly can without actually cutting your stitching line. The closer you can trim it, the tinier your finished hem can be. Appliqué and embroidery scissors are good for this, but any small, sharp scissors will be fine.

Fold the seam up to the fabric’s wrong side one more time, keeping it as narrow as possible. Now it’s time to press the hem.

Topstitch (that is, sew from the right side of the fabric) close to the inner fold. This should also be close to the outer fold, since the hem is so tiny. 😉 Use your fingertips to feel this inner fold so you can tell where to stitch.

Why not just stitch from the wrong side of the fabric? In my experience, if stitching is going to look weird, it’s going to happen on the bobbin side of the seam. I like to have that on the inside of the garment. And I just want to keep a close eye on the visible part of the seam to be sure.

Don’t backstitch when you start/stop a line of topstitching; this will leave a visible build-up of thread in your line. Instead, leave several inches of thread tails. When you’re done with the topstitching, thread a hand stitching needle with the top threads, and send them to the wrong side of the fabric. Now you can neatly tie off the threads by hand.

Give the hem another good press, and you’re done!

The rolled hem is a few extra steps, but it really isn’t hard at all. And now that you have another beautiful, couture finish in your sewing repertoire, go and create even more amazing things!

What’s a sewing technique you’ve always wanted to learn?

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Pattern Hack: Subtle High-Low Hem for the Brook Blossom Skirt https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-subtle-high-low-hem-for-the-brook-blossom-skirt?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pattern-hack-subtle-high-low-hem-for-the-brook-blossom-skirt https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-subtle-high-low-hem-for-the-brook-blossom-skirt#respond Tue, 16 Jan 2018 01:28:07 +0000 http://orangedaisypatterns.com/?p=499 I’m bringing home another Brook Blossom Skirt pattern hack for you that I originally wrote for One Thimble. (Not familiar with One Thimble? It’s a digital sewing magazine, published four times a year, full of original patterns, tutorials, and handmade business advice. My favorite issues are #12 and #15. 🙂 (affiliate links) You should definitely […]

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I’m bringing home another Brook Blossom Skirt pattern hack for you that I originally wrote for One Thimble. (Not familiar with One Thimble? It’s a digital sewing magazine, published four times a year, full of original patterns, tutorials, and handmade business advice. My favorite issues are #12 and #15. 🙂 (affiliate links) You should definitely check them out. 😉 )

Subtle High-Low Hem Pattern Hack Title Image

Want yet another hemline for the Brook Blossom Skirt for you and your girls? Anya, who blogs over at Anna Zoe and was one of my wonderful pattern testers, came up with this beautiful pattern hack—the Subtle High-Low Hem. She explains here how she made the change. I’m going to explain another way to do it.

Anya’s method is best for quick one-offs. If you want to make multiple skirts, whether for selling in your shop or because you love your first one so much you have to make one in every color, go ahead and adjust the pattern.

Here’s how:

First, line up your high-low skirt front and back pattern pieces, overlapping them at the side seam by 5/8” (1.5cm) so that they line up on the seam line itself.

Mark the center front length (knee-length) on the side seam and center back. This will give you a guide to know how long to make your new hem. Go ahead and mark the knee-length hem all the way around. (You could trace your knee-length pattern if you have it already printed.) This makes it easier to see the change.

Mark the new back length. Draw a smooth curve for your new hemline. Be sure to keep the line at a right angle to the center front and center back for 1/4” (6mm) before curving; this will prevent sharp points when you cut out your fabric.

Depending on the curve you chose—the more dramatic a curve, the more necessary—you may need to square the side seam’s seam allowance. It’s easy! Just make the seam allowance go straight out from the seam line, rather than following the curve of the skirt. This will make sure the seam allowances match up when you go to sew them together.

There you have it! You’ve finished hacking your pattern! Simply sew up your skirt as directed in the pattern.

While I love the boldness and drama of the Brook Blossom Skirt’s original high-low hem, I also love the softness and classiness of the subtle high-low. Thanks, Anya, for making your beautiful skirt and inspiring this tutorial.

We’d love to see your own Brook Blossom Skirt! Be sure to tag your beautiful sews with #BrookBlossomSkirt and @orangedaisypatterns to share your creative genius with your fellow sewers and see what they’ve been creating as well!

Don’t have the pattern yet? Order the Brook Blossom Skirt today! And for adorable Mommy & Me fun, buy the girls and ladies Brook Blossom Skirts bundled together for a discount!

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Pattern Hack: How to Sew the Girls Brook Blossom Skirt with Sheer Fabrics https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-how-to-sew-the-girls-brook-blossom-skirt-with-sheer-fabrics?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pattern-hack-how-to-sew-the-girls-brook-blossom-skirt-with-sheer-fabrics https://orangedaisypatterns.com/pattern_hack/pattern-hack-how-to-sew-the-girls-brook-blossom-skirt-with-sheer-fabrics#respond Mon, 15 Jan 2018 23:12:25 +0000 http://orangedaisypatterns.com/?p=477 It was such a great experience to work with One Thimble on Issue 12 (affiliate link for what is still one of my favorite issues!). Who else gets so much more done with deadlines? And to contribute with other creative ladies to produce such a beautiful magazine? Love! This tutorial was originally posted on One […]

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It was such a great experience to work with One Thimble on Issue 12 (affiliate link for what is still one of my favorite issues!). Who else gets so much more done with deadlines? And to contribute with other creative ladies to produce such a beautiful magazine? Love!

This tutorial was originally posted on One Thimble’s blog, and it’s time to bring it home!

Who’s ready for some pattern hacking?

How to sew the Girls Brook Blossom Skirt with Sheer Fabrics

How fun would it be to use the lined option for the Brook Blossom Skirt with a sheer fabric on top? Make the skirt a little fancier, more ethereal… The thing is, you don’t want to see the elastic (girls’ version) or zipper (ladies’ version) from the outside, so you do need to do things just a little different than when you use only opaque fabrics. It’s really simple, though. I’ll show you with the girls’ version.

(Because of the zipper, the ladies version has more small changes, so that will have to wait for a separate tutorial. Oh, the suspense!)

But first, some general tips on using sheers:

  • Go slowly and carefully! Sheers tend to be difficult to work with, so take your time.
  • Before you prewash the fabric, serge or zig-zag down the cut edges. These fabrics tend to fray a lot, especially in the wash, so let’s prevent that.
  • Be aware that sheers often want to shift when cutting. I suggest using a rotary cutter and mat and pattern weights (small cans of food work great) in rather than scissors and pinning.
  • A walking foot, while not necessary, is very helpful.
  • To prevent your sewing machine from “eating” the fabric, hold the thread tails out of the way and gently pull them as you start sewing. Keep in mind that you are not using them to pull the fabric through the machine; rather, you are keeping just enough tension on the threads to keep the fabric from being pushed down into the machine. Once you’ve gotten going, you can drop the threads.
  • I don’t typically use many pins when I sew, but with these misbehaving fabrics, I recommend using plenty of them. Keep the pins within the seam allowance, though, in case they leave a hole in these delicate fabrics.
  • Be aware of your iron temperature! Some types of sheers will require low temperatures.
  • I hope I haven’t scared you away! You can do it!! Let’s go.

The biggest change you’ll need to make to sew up this skirt with a sheer top layer is to underline the yoke pieces. Underlining is not the same as lining; when you underline the garment, you sew a different type of fabric onto the fashion fabric and then use the joined pieces as if they were one. (You’ll see what I mean in a minute.) The underlining will strengthen the sheer, providing support for the yoke, and also hide the inner workings of the skirt. (Here’s a Craftsy article on the topic if you want more information.)

Cut these pieces to sew the Girls Brook Blossom Skirt with Sheer Fabrics

First, cut out an extra yoke (both front and back) from your lining fabric. These are pattern pieces 1 and 3. The picture shows all the things you need to cut from those pattern pieces. Yes, it’s a lot. On the plus side, the pieces are small, so you shouldn’t have to buy extra fabric for the extra yokes.

Fuse the interfacing onto the extra lining yokes, rather than onto the main (meaning sheer) fabric.

Underline the skirt's yoke pieces.

Layer the yoke pieces you just interfaced right side up with the sheer, also right side up, on top of them. Baste around the edges within the seam allowance. Remember to go slowly and use lots of pins!

Follow the pattern as written until it’s time to attach the skirt pieces to the yokes. There is only one change left!

Now we attach the skirt to the yoke

Namely, the pattern directs you to attach the lining with the wrong side out/right side in. This is to give the most beautiful interior possible. With a sheer top layer, though, you will want the right side facing out, since you’ll be able to see it through the sheer.

It can help to baste (within the seam allowance so you don’t have to remove it later) the sheer skirt to the lining skirt, to keep the two skirts lined up properly.

Continue on as the pattern directs. Those are all the changes!

I love how this simple adaptation makes the already versatile Brook Blossom Skirt even more serviceable. Flower girl skirt? Sure! Fairy princess costume? Why not? And of course, my little redhead loves it for simply playing around at home. And my oldest daughter has already asked for one of her own.

Happy girl wearing her Girls Brook Blossom Skirt

I love this cute face! She’s gotten so much bigger since I posted this tutorial originally. But she smiles the same bit, happy smile. 😀

We’d love to see your Girls Brook Blossom Skirt! Be sure to tag your beautiful sews with #BrookBlossomSkirt and @orangedaisypatterns to share your creative genius with your fellow sewers and see what they’ve been creating as well!

Don’t have the pattern yet? Order the Girls Brook Blossom Skirt today! And your daughters don’t have to have all the fun; buy the ladies version or get girls and ladies Brook Blossom Skirts bundled together for a discount!

Happy sewing!

The post Pattern Hack: How to Sew the Girls Brook Blossom Skirt with Sheer Fabrics appeared first on Orange Daisy Patterns.

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